Exercise and Brain Health

January 3, 2018

Exercise and Brain Health

Where did I leave my keys? What was it I needed from the store? Why did I come into this room? Do you want to become mentally stronger, sharper and faster? It’s these types of forgetful moments that can be easily chalked up to aging, being busy or stressed. Memory slips can be troublesome, but not inevitable! There are simple and practical ways to boost brain health and cut down on risk for memory loss.

A few proven tricks to help your brain remember are:

Make a note. Writing it down takes the burden off your brain.

Do one thing at a time.  Multi-tasking leads to forgetfulness.

Follow a routine. Leave your wallet in the same place every day.

The mind body health connection refers to how our thoughts and emotions can play a central role in aspects of our physical health. It turns out that this connection may be a two-way street. A recent study cited that physical exercise might boost brain structure. Aerobic activity improves mood, but is also proving to be a simple way to cut down risk for memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease.

Brain health is more than just having a strong memory. A fit brain leads one to:

  1. Think faster and more efficiently.
  2. Save time by making less errors.
  3. Greater joy and excitement from a sharper focus.
  4. Feel more confident in conversations rather than struggling for lost words.
  5. Improved auditory processing that enhance listening skills for more fulfilling interactions.
  6. React to visual details more quickly.

Exercise is proving to be a key to:

  • Increase blood flow that carries oxygen to the brain.
  • Repair and protect brain cells.
  • Help grow new neurons.

This is another example of how benefits of a corporate wellness program flow into other areas such as training and development, productivity and improvement in the bottom line. A wellness coach can help move the needle to improve mind-body health of individuals by asking questions that delve deeper into the desires of an individual to help create the association between an individual’s inner desires and the lifestyle behaviors that lead to quality of life improvement.

*Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, Okonkwo